Cheap Travel Insurance For People With Kidney Transplant

WWW.TRAVELINSURANCEKIDNEYTRANSPLANT.CO.UK

Travel insurance if you have a kidney transplant is essential when you travel or take a holiday abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment. The cost of receiving medical treatment away from the UK can be very high. For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance with a kidney transplant).

Travellers with a kidney transplant have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with a kidney transplant, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

For example, a 54 year old male, travelling to the United States of America for 1 week would pay around £13.42 if they didn’t have a kidney transplant, but for the same person with a kidney transplant, the premium could be £36.41, that’s around 3 times more expensive.

Typically customers with a kidney transplant might also suffer with another condition. In our example the premium would still be £36.41 assuming the applicant was taking 2 additional medications for high blood pressure.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are high blood pressure, high cholesterol and whether you smoke.

Kidney transplant and travel insurance

Kidney transplantation or renal transplantation is the organ transplant of a kidney into a patient with end-stage renal disease. Kidney transplantation is typically classified as deceased-donor (formerly known as cadaveric) or living-donor transplantation depending on the source of the donor organ. Living-donor renal transplants are further characterized as genetically related (living-related) or non-related (living-unrelated) transplants, depending on whether a biological relationship exists between the donor and recipient.

History

The first kidney transplantation was performed on June 17, 1950. Although the donated kidney was rejected ten months later because no immunosuppressive therapy was available at the time—the development of effective antirejection drugs was years away—the intervening time gave Tucker's remaining kidney time to recover and she lived another five years.

The first kidney transplants between living patients were undertaken in 1954 in Boston and Paris. The procedure was done between identical twins Ronald and Richard Herrick to eliminate any problems of an immune reaction. For this and later work, Dr. Murray received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1990.

The first kidney transplantation in the United Kingdom did not occur until 1960, when Michael Woodruff performed one between identical twins in Edinburgh.

Finally, those that are awaiting a diagnosis or additional tests face the highest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.